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Adobe Photoshop CS3 Extended review

The 10th release of Adobe's flagship product -- and the most well-known graphics manipulation program in the world -- is Vista-ready, has a few interesting new features, and is now fully integrated with the latest versions of what were Macromedia's Web development tools. If this is your first version of Photoshop in a professional atmosphere, you'll love it; but if you're happily working with an older version, I doubt Photoshop CS3 will convince you to upgrade.

Adobe Flash Professional CS3 review

Flash is one of the most important media formats in the history of personal computing. It will never be accused of being technologically advanced, resource-efficient, and optimally compatible across multiple versions and platforms, but undeniably Flash is the de facto animation standard on the Web. Tools to create Flash programs and animations have varied in depth of features and quality of operation, but nothing has ever been able to compete with the original Macromedia Flash development environment. Now in the hands of Adobe after its acquisition of Macromedia almost two years ago, Flash is finally alive and fully operating under a new corporate banner. Unlike previous releases, Flash Professional CS3 offers a number of must-have improvements, but it also has a larger number of marginal or meaningless enhancements, and the elimination of Flash's 2D counterpart, FreeHand, is a huge negative point for veteran Flash developers and artists.

Using OpenBSD 4.1

If you're a software enthusiast who has never used OpenBSD before, you might enjoy installing it by yourself and figuring it out as you go. If, however, you're looking for a more practical approach to using OpenBSD 4.1 on a desktop or server machine, here's a quick guide to get you started in this spectacular operating system.

OpenBSD 4.1 review

OpenBSD 4.1 was released on May 1 with its usual mix of new hardware support and enhanced operating system features. OpenBSD releases generally represent a large collection of small changes plus a few new administration and networking tools. Beyond the standard "many little changes," the big news with 4.1 is a working native port of OpenOffice.org, the elimination of the Simtech StrongARM "cats" architecture from active development, and improved greylisting capabilities in the spamd spam filter.

Ubuntu 7.04 Review

Ubuntu Linux continues to show steady improvement with version 7.04, but there's still room for improvement. Despite the handful of shortcomings in 7.04, this is the best release Ubuntu's yet had. If they didn't before, commercial GNU/Linux vendors should now feel quite threatened by Ubuntu Linux.

Windows Vista review

It's been more than 6 years since the last release of Microsoft's Windows desktop operating system. In that time, the operating system market has changed dramatically. No longer are there simple, standard PCs -- we now have tablets, handhelds, set-top boxes, and network appliances. We have low-end "email and Web" desktops, high-end gaming machines, and superpowered workstations. Having tested Windows Vista Ultimate Edition -- the most aggressively-featured edition of Vista -- I have to wonder if the Microsoft software engineers have been paying attention to any of these markets, because Vista, though an improvement over XP in many ways, doesn't seem to fit into any of them. It performs poorly, has substandard software and hardware support, and is prohibitively expensive. That's not to say that there's nothing to like about Vista, but the negative outweighs the positive.

Improving video quality on the Nokia E61 Smartphone

The Nokia E61 was billed by many as the next "Treo killer" smartphone, with an impressive array of email options, multimedia capabilities, a vibrant 3-inch screen, long battery life, comfortable QWERTY keyboard, and above average reception and voice quality. I think it's definitely lived up to the hype, and many reviewers and users agree. Be that as it may, there are some shortcomings that irritate me -- specifically, the E61's relatively poor performance playing video. This article will examine video recording, encoding, and playback options that will help improve a video's quality when viewed on portable devices like the Nokia E61.

Mandriva Linux 2007.1 review

After making a lot of progress with Mandriva Linux 2007, I thought perhaps Mandriva had turned over a new leaf, and was using that release as a starting point for an overall better quality operating environment. I was totally wrong. Both the PowerPack Edition and Discovery/LX have slid so far back with version 2007.1 that I have serious doubts as to the future of Mandriva's viability as a commercial desktop operating system. Though some small but noticeable bugs were fixed and all of the usual packages have been upgraded in this new release, so much important functionality has been removed from it -- and new, more serious bugs introduced -- that Mandriva Linux 2007.1 has no hope of competing with other recently-released desktop operating systems.

Cedega 6.0 review

Though it's updated almost every month to account for various patches and other incremental improvements, version 6.0 of TransGaming's Windows gaming API emulation framework, Cedega, has more substantial improvements. Specifically, Cedega 6.0 performs markedly better and has improved support for DirectX 9 games. It's probably not enough of an improvement to sway new users to ditch Windows and move to GNU/Linux, but current Cedega subscribers should have something to be excited about with version 6.0.

SoftMaker Office 2006 review

What started as a good, inexpensive word processor and later an equally good spreadsheet application has evolved into an office suite that rivals the low-end editions of Microsoft Office and Corel WordPerfect Office, while harrowing OpenOffice.org and StarOffice with better performance and Word document format compatibility. The TextMaker word processor and PlanMaker spreadsheet have been updated with new functionality, better compatibility with file formats from competing office suites, and better inter-program communication between both applications. It's the best cross-platform (Windows, Linux, BSD, Windows Mobile) office suite I've yet used.